Hello world!

How’s everyone doing? It’s really been a while since I last spoke with ya’ll… I think that whenever I say “oh, I’ll be posting regularly now!” it’s just never happens. So from now on, no more promises. I’ll try to keep on posting as much as I can! I love writing so much so don’t worry, I’m not going to stop anytime soon. Anyway, for today’s blog I’m back with another book review! This time it’s on “Angels and Demons”, by Dan Brown. I actually bought this book while I was on a fun day with my mum in Tel Aviv! I shared that with you guys, and told you that after I’m done reading it, I’ll post an update with my review and thoughts. So here it is!

I’ll start off by saying that I’ve heard a lot of good things about Dan Brown’s work- my mum read almost all of his books, so I think that during my childhood seeing his name written over so many books in our living room library kind of got me into the mood.

“Angels and Demons” is a book in which there are many perspectives and storylines going on at the same time, and by the end of it they all come together and become one. I love these types of books, and Brown made it very simple for the reader to follow without getting lost. The main point of view is Robert Langdon’s, a Harvard professor, that one day is asked to identify a weird symbol on a dead scientist’s chest. He quickly realizes that the symbol belongs to the secret brotherhood “Illuminati”. The Illuminati was a known enemy of the Catholic church, and soon enough Robert finds himself stuck in a dangerous and deadly battle between science and religion.

That’s all I can say without giving the whole book and plotline away- I’m going to try and keep this review as spoiler less as possible.

I think that it’s best to firstly get this out of the way- it is truly a great book. It has so many twists and surprises within it, and just as you think that you know what’s going on, you find out that you really don’t. It is the kind of book that will keep you wanting to know more- you could definitely binge read it. A specific thing that I loved about the book is how educational it is. Everything but the plotline is real- every place or fact. I loved how smart the book makes you feel while reading it- you get educated on the history of Rome, the Vatican, the Catholic church, certain artists, science, and more! It is well written, in a way that is easy to understand and take in without confusing or mixing things up.

Most of the characters are smart and good at decision making in my opinion, which always makes the book more interesting and easy to relate to- they’re not being stupid or doing dumb things just to mess the plot up- they’re always making the most realistic choices, and that for sure helps make the book more interesting and intriguing as the characters are acting exactly as they should.

Besides being a very good book, with a very good plotline, there were two main things that kind of bothered me while I was reading. It’s something that I would like to know before reading a book- maybe it’s the feminist in me, but it’s important to mention in my opinion. The first one being the fact that there were about three “active” female characters in the whole book. Sure, we’re told a bit about Saint Maria, or other Christian saints, but apart from that there are three. The first one, Maria, that’s dead, and we only barely see her in “flashbacks”, another one, Chinita Macri, that literally only exists to put her male co- worker in a better light, and Vittoria Vetra, the other main character, which I would elaborate on more in a minute. There are a few other female characters that are being shown every now and then, but I’m pretty sure that those are the only female characters that have names, and are being talked about or with more than once or twice. The underrepresentation of women in the book really annoyed and angered me at times while reading it, and even though I know that this book was written a while ago (May 2000, to be exact) I still think that more women could’ve been part of the plotline.

The second thing that bothered me, again looking at the book from a more of a feminist perspective, is Vittoria Vetra’s character. Vittoria is supposed to be a smart scientist, who’s also very connected to her religion and God. However, at times while reading I noticed that she doesn’t act like a woman at all- of course, there isn’t a way that a woman should be acting, but still- after been through so much trauma, after loosing so much- the first thing she does is throw herself at the closest man possible. When her body was about to be violated by someone else, without her consent, all she did was “have fire in her eyes”, whatever that means. I get that different people act differently in certain situations, but for me, it really felt as if the person who came up with her character never spoke to a real woman before. It seemed like she was written based off a fantasy or a very strong stereotype. Adding that to the fact that she was the only “main” woman character in the book, I found it quite disappointing. While reading the book, I felt like instead of empowering women, Vittoria’s character only strengthen the stereotypes surrounding them.

To conclude everything up- I loved the book. Truly. I would definitely look forward to reading more books by Dan Brown, and maybe even re-read “Angels and Demons” some time as well. I would recommend this book to anyone who’s interesting in learning in a unique and interesting way, as well as anyone who loves adventures and thriller. However, this book isn’t perfect, and the underrepresentation of women, as well as the way they’re described in the book bothered me.

I really hope that you enjoyed reading this review, and that I’m getting better at it! Usually I’d like to give more of my opinion on the storyline, but in “Angels and Demons” there are so many plot twists, that I wouldn’t be able to do it without giving the whole book away.

If you’d like to buy the book, you can get it right here

Thanks so much for reading, if you made it this far- I appreciate it! If you’ve already read the book, let me know what are your thoughts on it! Do you agree with mine? What are books that you’d recommend? Make sure to drink tons of water, and take care of your physical and mental health. And wear a mask! The pandemic isn’t over just yet!

See you soon, and take care!

Toodles! 🦄

-Ocean girl

2 thoughts on “Angels and Demons- Book Review 📚

  1. Great review. This was ny favourite of Brown’s books – unless it’s The Lost Symbol – I haven’t read it I suppose since I was 11 when the Da Vinci Code film was released and turned me on to Brown. But religion, and Catholicism, fascinates me, so I loved being a fly on the wall to this stuff. Above all though I was obssessed with the ambigrams, how cool are they?

    I think all of his books are fun and would recommend them – his latest I was quite uninterested by – I’m even going to have to look up the title 😄: ‘Origin’! Yep that’s it.

    I’ve never been particularly impressed by his women so if you read his others don’t expect much. Of course thats just my opinion. However in his partial defence – at least in terms of quantity – the book is set in the Vatican.

    Non-Brown but in a similar vein, there’s one called ‘Light in the Shadows’ by Lafferty and Stone which is basically ‘The Carravagio Code’. Was fairly enjoyable.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you for taking the time to leave a comment! I agree, whenever there was a picture of the ambigrams on the pages, I would always spend a few minutes looking at it, and turning the book around! Even though I was quite disappointed with the representation of women in this book, no matter the reason, I’d probably still read the rest of Brown’s books, as they seem to be really smart, interesting, and intriguing. Also, thank you for the recommendations! I’d definitely check these books out! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

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